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Cutting to the “Common Core” for Grades 9—12

2014 Winter Series590x 

Join us in Orlando • February 14—15

** Register by February 7** 

The Interactive Institute for High School Educators 

Cutting to the “Common Core” for Grades 9—12 is designed to increase your knowledge of mathematics content related to the Common Core domains for the high school grades. 

This institute is part of the NCTM Interactive Institute Winter Professional Development Series—Cutting to the “Common Core,” available for Pre-K-12 Teachers and School Leaders.  


Learn more about NCTM's Interactive Institute   2014 Winter Institute 9-12180x 

Focus on Your Grade   

Who Should Attend 

What You'll Accomplish  

Topics 

Schedule Overview  

Keynotes  

Program & Presentations 

Registration & Rates  

Hotel & Travel  


Focus on Your Grade

The experience will be suited to your interests—you’ll take part in sessions and be grouped with educators according to the grade level you select for your strand of focus.

Strands   

  • Algebra 1
  • Geometry 
  • Algebra 2

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Who Should Attend 

  • High school mathematics teachers
  • Math coaches and teacher leaders
  • High school supervisors
  • Teacher educators
  • Preservice teachers
  • College mathematics teachers

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What You Will Accomplish—Defined Outcomes

Participants will—

    • increase their knowledge of mathematics content related to the Common Core domains for high school.;
    • identify instructional strategies that develop students' habits of mind as espoused in the Standards for Mathematical Practice;
    • participate in classroom-ready activities that model formative assessment and appropriate pedagogy promoted  in the Common Core State Standards;
    • examine mathematical content through the lens of the mathematical practices.
    • engage in activities related to task selection, development, and implementation that are linked to the CCSSM content and practice standards.

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Topics 

  • Algebra
  • Functions
  • Modeling
  • Geometry

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 Schedule Overview 

Friday, February 14  

(All content on this day will be addressed through the lens of the mathematical practices.)

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Materials Pickup

9:00 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Mathematical Practices Keynote (Diane Briars)

10:15 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Break

10:30 a.m.–Noon

Breakout Workshop 1

Noon-1:00 p.m.

Lunch

1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

Breakout Workshop 2

2:30 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

Break

2:45-p.m.-4:15p.m.

Breakout Workshop 3

Saturday, February 15  

(All content on this day will be addressed through the lens of assessment.)

8:30 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Assessment Keynote (Presentations by Smarter Balanced and PARCC

9:45 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Break

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Breakout Workshop 4

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. 

Lunch

12:30 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

Breakout Workshop 5

2:00 p.m.- 2:15 p.m. 

Break 

2:15 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Breakout Workshop 6

 

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Keynote Presentations  

Diane Briars 

DIANE BRIARS
President-Elect, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

Cutting to the Common Core for Grades 6–12: Focus on the Standards for Mathematical Practice  

The Standards for Mathematical Practice are an integral part of CCSSM with significant implications for mathematics teaching and learning. In this session, we will analyze these standards: What they are, why they are important, and what they look like “in action” in grade 6–12 classrooms.

Diane J. Briars is a mathematics education consultant and senior developer and research associate for the NSF-funded Intensified Algebra Project—a joint venture of the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of Texas at Austin, and the technology company Agile Mind. Briars has served in many roles in NCTM over the years and has also had leadership roles with other national education organizations, including serving as president of the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) and as a trustee of the College Board.

Doug Sovde 

PARCC Mathematics  

DOUG SOVDE
Director, PARCC Content and Instructional Supports   

Incorporating PARCC Tools into Your School Improvement Plan   

Learn about PARCC’s approach to assessing CCSSM using a variety of tools, and receive guidance and coaching in putting those tools to work in school classrooms.

                         
 Shelbi Cole  Smarter Balanced Mathematics  

SHELBI K. COLE
Director of Mathematics

Collaboration is the Key to Better Assessment

Learn how the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium has used the collective capacity of its member states to create a common vision for better mathematics assessment.

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Program & Presentations

 

Gail BurrillGAIL BURRILL
Michigan State University

 

 

 

 

 

Day 1: Algebra 1  

Session 1 
Algebra in CCSSM: Why Structure?  

What should algebra in high school look like? What adjustments do we as teachers need to make so that our students engage in the mathematical practices in the course of learning algebra? Concrete examples will help make the vision of what should be done into the reality of what we do.

The session will provide a broad look at the mathematical foundations set in middle school and look forward to the changes necessary in introductory high school algebra, with a focus on major structural revisions. The algebra cluster as it relates to both structure and mathematical practices will be emphasized, with special attention again paid to structure. Participants will be provided with a “look before you leap” worksheet as well as “quarterback ratings.” worksheet.  
 

Session 2 
Connecting Algebraic Concepts Through Well-Chosen Tasks 

Some mathematics problems can challenge students to think about important ideas, entice them to participate in mathematics, and provoke different strategies that use varying levels of mathematics. Working through such a problem, participants will consider the need for students to make explicit the assumptions that they use in solving the problem and how teachers can validate student thinking in light of these assumptions by publicly acknowledging and validating different approaches in a deliberate, systematic discussion. 

Participants will engage in a task that incorporates linearity, rate of change, arithmetic sequences, and quadratics and that also involves modeling, problem solving, critiquing the reasoning of others, and reasoning from repeated patterns.
 

Session 3 
Reframing Our Work to Engage Students in the Mathematical Practices 

CCSSM calls for a shift in the way that students engage in mathematics. The verbs have changed from “solve,” “simplify,” and “factor” to “understand,” “create,” “explain,” “relate,” “summarize,”and “analyze.” What are some strategies we can use to make this shift in the way algebra is taught and learned?

The focus will be on how to transform ordinary procedural tasks into absorbing situations that support students’ engagement in the mathematical practices. Tasks might include solving six or eight systems of equations, formulating equations that are equivalent to given solutions or characteristics of solutions, and formulating graphs with certain characteristics.
 

Day 2: Formative Assessment–Statistics  

Linking Formative Assessments to the Standards for Mathematical Practice  
Content, mathematical practices, and tasks are not enough. The missing component is how these are delivered in the classroom—and formative assessment is the key. Examples from data will focus participants’ work.

Participants will develop the concept of margin of error using a mystery bag of M&Ms. Formative assessment strategies will be embedded in the development of the task, which will also include a particular focus on the type of questions that move learning forward.

 


 

Benjamin SinwellBEN SINWELL
Pendleton High School 

 

 

 

 

 

 Day 1: Geometry  (Registrants are encouraged to to bring a laptop or tablet for this strand.)  

Session 1 
Connecting Algebra and Geometry through Coordinates: Transforming Lines to Make Polygons 

The effects of transformations on lines and the resulting polygons will be analyzed. Explicit connections will be made to the CCSSM Standard for Mathematical Practice. Participants will look for and make use of mathematical structure to relate this task to future mathematical content. Slopes of lines, translations, reflections, rotations, systems of equations, and relationships in special right triangles will be discussed.

Participants will engage in a rich task that makes connections between algebra 1 and geometry. The mathematical practice will be used and discussed. Formative assessment strategies will take place while the participants are working.
 

Session 2 
Using Transformation to Make Connections Between Polygons and Circles: Linking the CCSSM Content and Practice Standards 

This session will build on the previous one and will focus on the use of dilations to help students understand similarity. By connecting geometric constructions (with compass and straightedge or dynamic software) of regular polygons to the transformations of circles in the coordinate plane, instruction can fuse the CCSSM practice standards with the CCSSM content standards.

Teachers will explore modeling right triangle similarity by graphing linear equations. A regular hexagon will be constructed (and proved) with the use of compasses and dynamic geometry software. The equation of a circle will be transformed to make the same construction in the coordinate plane. Explicit connections will be made to the regular polygons discussed on Day 1.
 

Session 3 
Reframing Our Work to Engage Students in the Mathematical Practices 

CCSSM calls for a shift in the way students engage in mathematics. The verbs have changed from “solve,” “simplify,” and “factor” to “understand,” “create,” “explain,” “relate,” “summarize,” and “analyze.” What are some strategies that we can use to make this shift in the way that geometry is taught and learned?

The focus will be on how to transform ordinary procedural tasks into absorbing situations that support students’ engagement in the mathematical practices. Tasks might include sorting a group of graphs by lines of symmetry, looking at slopes and intercepts to determine equations, and studying the properties of polygons.

Day 2: Formative Assessment–Modeling 

Linking Formative Assessments to the Standards for Mathematical Practice 
Content, mathematical practices, and tasks are not enough. The missing component is how these are delivered in the classroom—and formative assessment is the key. Examples from modeling will focus participants’ work.

Participants will use manipulatives (Cuisenaire rods and toothpicks) to model explicit and recursive functions.Formative assessment strategies will be embedded in the development of the task, which will also include a focus on the type of questions that move learning forward.

 


 

Alyssa HoslarALYSSA HOSLAR
Strongsville High School 

  

  

  

  

   

 Day 1: Algebra 2  

Session 1 
Three Points: How to Make Use of Structure 
CCSSM asks students to create and build functions as well as being able to analyze existing functions. A given situation can be used to generate possible functions. How are these functions related, and how does structure play a role in the development of these functions?

Session 2 
Algebra II in the CCSSM: Why is Linearity Important? 
Linearity is not only a central tool in and of itself but it also generates important ideas related to quadratic and rational functions. Interaction between graphical and symbolic representations can promote a better understanding of the mathematics involved.

Session 3 
Reframing Our Work to Engage Students in the Mathematical Practices 
CCSSM calls for a shift in the way students engage in mathematics. The verbs have changed from “solve,” “simplify,” and “factor” to “understand,” “create,” “explain,” “relate,” “summarize,” and “analyze.. What are some strategies we can use to make this shift in our classrooms?

Day 2: Formative Assessment–Functions  

Linking Formative Assessments to the Standards for Mathematical Practice 
Content, practices, and tasks are not enough. The missing component is how these are delivered in the classroom—and formative assessment is the key. Examples from algebra 2 will focus participants’ work.

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