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Linking Research & Practice Outstanding Publication Awards

Over the past several years, NCTM has increased its effort to link research and practice in mathematics education. As part of that effort, NCTM’s Research Committee created the Linking Research and Practice Outstanding Publication Award to recognize work that integrates research and practice and is disseminated to practitioner audiences. Each year one article from each practitioner journal—Teaching Children Mathematics, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, and Mathematics Teacher—will be selected.

Teaching Children Mathematics

 
2013-2014 TCM LRP
 
Above: Jonathan N. Thomas and NCTM President Linda Gojak

Jonathan N. Thomas and Pamela D. Tabor were presented the 2013-2014 Linking Research and Practice Outstanding Publication Award for their article "Developing Quantitative Mental Imagery" published in Teaching Children Mathematics, October 2012. From a series of teaching experiments, the article examines how Stages of Early Arithmetic Learning model how children come to understand quantity, from “physical entity toward more abstract, mental construction of quantity.” The notion of re-presentations is used “to describe how children mentally re-present or re-enact a prior sensory experience to themselves.” Their article offers teachers tools for understanding progression through stages and in helping students “see math with their ‘mind’s eye’ via construction of quantitative mental imagery.’”

Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School 

 
2013-2014 MTMS LRP WINNER
 
Above: Kara Jackson and and NCTM President Linda Gojak

Kara J. Jackson, Emily C. Shahan, Lynsey K. Gibbons, and Paul A. Cobb were presented the Linking Research and Practice Outstanding Publication Award for their article "Launching Complex Tasks" published in Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School (August 2012). Their article analyzed videorecordings of 132 middle-grades mathematics teachers to answer the question: How can a teacher launch a complex task so students are able to engage productively with it? “Complex tasks invite students to generate multiple solutions and justify their reasoning. Such tasks live up to their potential only if students engage productively in the task.” The authors support teachers with four critical elements for successfully launching and planning of complex tasks.


Mathematics Teacher

 
2013-2014 MT LRP AWARD
 
Above: Heather Lynn Johnson and NCTM President Linda Gojak

Heather Lynn Johnson was presented the Linking Research and Practice Outstanding Publication Award for her article "Connecting Research to Teaching: Reasoning about Quantities That Change Together" published in Mathematics Teacher (May 2013). In this article, the author draws on interviews with mathematics students to show how they make sense of situations involving quantities that change together. This work stresses the importance of teachers attending to students’ quantitative reasoning involving rates of change. Helping students early on to understand how quantities covary prepares them “to draw on their informal ways of reasoning when the time comes to formalize relationships between varying quantities” in more complex ways, such as in calculus.

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