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Closing the Achievement Gap

The Passion to Achieve
What does it mean to achieve in mathematics? (NCTM News Bulletin, May/June 2007)

The Passion to Systematize
Passionate education professionals have been able to make the achievement gap narrower by developing highly functioning systems. (NCTM News Bulletin, April 2007)

The Passion to Design Data Systems
To close the achievement gap, we must make it possible for teachers and students to learn from and make decisions based on the data generated by assessments and evaluations. (NCTM News Bulletin, March 2007)

The Passion to Lead
To close the achievement gap, we must work together and encourage more dedicated mathematics educators to lead the way. (NCTM News Bulletin, January/February 2007)

The Passion to Learn
To ignite the passion to learn in students, we must first embrace the passion to learn ourselves. (NCTM News Bulletin, December 2006)

Finding the Passion to Teach Significant Mathematics
To close the achievement gap, we can do two important things--motivate our students to learn significant mathematics and give them all opportunities to learn it. (NCTM News Bulletin, November 2006)

Finding the Passion
Many successful efforts to close the achievement gap are the result of a deep passion for teaching. (NCTM News Bulletin, October 2006)

About the Editors

Nancy Berkas and Cyntha Pattison have spent their entire careers working in the education field.

They have worked as classroom teachers, teacher mentors, cooperating teachers with student teachers, curriculum specialists, adjunct professors, trainers of trainers, workshop and in-service presenters, product developers, technical assistance providers, and professional development providers. Having worked at the building, district, state, regional, and international levels, they have had a wide range of experiences involving the achievement gap and understand the complexities of the existing challenges. To reach them, e-mail nberkas@charter.net and cpattison@charter.net, phone (920) 397-6128, or fax (920) 563-4336.

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