Journal for Research in Mathematics Education

  • Vol. 48, No. 2, March 2017

    Jinfa Cai, Anne Morris, Charles Hohensee, Stephen Hwang, Victoria Robison, and James Hiebert, University of Delaware

     

    This editorial focuses on defining and elaborating exactly what the authors mean by “the impact of educational research on students’ learning.”

     

    Julia Aguirre, University of Washington Tacoma; Beth Herbel-Eisenmann, Michigan State University; Sylvia Celedón-Pattichis, University of New Mexico; Marta Civil, University of Arizona; Trena Wilkerson, Baylor University; Michelle Stephan, University of North Carolina-Charlotte; Stephen Pape, Johns Hopkins University; Douglas H. Clements, University of Denver;
    This Research Committee commentary describes how mathematics education researchers, or MERs, need to build on equity. The committee states that equity should no longer be a choice but an intentional, collective, and professional responsibility of the MER community.
    Erik D. Jacobson, Indiana University
    This study (n = 1,044) used data from the Teacher Education and Development Study in Mathematics (TEDS-M) to examine the relationship between field experience focus (instruction- or exploration-focused), duration, and timing (early or not) and prospective elementary teachers’ intertwined knowledge and beliefs about mathematics and mathematics learning. Findings suggest that field experience has important but largely overlooked relationships with prospective teachers’ mathematical knowledge and beliefs. Implications for future research are discussed.
    Darrell Earnest, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

     

    This article reports on elementary students’ understanding of time in the context of common classroom manipulatives and notational systems. Students in Grades 2 (n = 72) and 4 (n = 72) participated in problem-solving interviews involving different clocks. Quantitative results revealed that students’ performances were significantly different as a function of the tool available. Implications for theory and the treatment of time in curriculum and instruction are discussed.

     

    Reviewed by Emily Miller, West Chester University, Martha Makowski, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Yasemin Copur-Gencturk, University of Southern California, and Sarah Lubienski, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    A book review of Large-Scale Studies in Mathematics Education, by James A. Middleton, Jinfa Cai, and Stephen Hwang.