President's Messages: J. Michael Shaughnessey

  • 1 - 19 of 19 results

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    We all probably have had a friend or acquaintance, or even a perfect stranger, raving about a book she has just read, or a movie he has recently seen, and then saying, “Oh, you must read this book!” or, “You must see that film!” But how many of us have had this kind of experience in a social occasion where the person exclaimed, “Oh, you must see this proof!” So it was indeed refreshing to meet someone who really likes mathematics, as I did several weeks ago, in what might seem like a very unlikely setting—the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington, D.C.

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    More and more these days, in educational meetings, conferences, and policy arenas, the talk is that "it’s all about STEM." STEM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and it has rapidly become a driving force in educational policy and funding decisions in the United States. I find both strengths and problems with the current STEM discussions across our professional communities.

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    When the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were released in 2010, a joint task force representing NCTM, the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM), the Association of State Supervisors of Mathematics (ASSM), and the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) was appointed to make recommendations to assist our respective members with the task of implementing and assessing the new standards...(January 2012)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    When the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) were released last year, a Joint Task Force of NCTM, NCSM, ASSM, AMTE was appointed to make recommendations to assist our respective members in implementing and assessing the new standards.…some of the recommendations appeared to me to be of particular importance to NCTM members who are involved in offering, receiving, or making decisions about professional development in mathematics—especially teachers, supervisors, and professional development leaders... (December 2011)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    Many of you will remember a similar mantra from John Lennon during the antiwar movement in the 1960s. Recent conversations with NCTM members at our fall regional conferences, and several recent critical reviews of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), have resurrected this mantra for me. (November 2011)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    Is it just me, or does geometry seem to be in the background these days? Slogans like “Algebra for all” and policies designed to ensure that all students complete algebra by the end of eighth grade have caught the national attention in recent years... (October 2011)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    As we begin the new school year, I wish you and your students the best ever mathematics teaching and learning adventure. It is our love for the mathematics itself, and the satisfaction we obtain from watching our students grow in their mathematical thinking, that keep us wedded to this marvelous profession as teachers of mathematics... (September 2011)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    Last week over 700 high school mathematics teachers and leaders participated in the first NCTM Interactive Institute: Infusing the Classroom with Reasoning and Sense Making... (August 2011)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    In last month’s President’s message, I mentioned that with the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, some changes will occur over the next three years in the teaching and assessing of our K–12 mathematics students... (June 2011)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    Recently, I had the opportunity to participate in a working conference on issues related to mathematics curriculum and assessment under the new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). Forty-four states have now adopted CCSSM, launched by the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices in 2010. The Department of Education has funded two consortia to develop assessment instruments for CCSSM... (May 2011)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    In the February President’s message, I addressed the issue of alternative pathways for our secondary mathematics students as they make the transition from high school mathematics into post-secondary mathematics in colleges, community colleges, and universities. In that column, I posed several questions that catalyzed my reflections on the need for alternatives to the current predominant pathway available to our secondary students—the pathway that leads to college calculus... (March 2011)   

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    For some time I have been concerned about the mathematics that we are teaching our K–12 students and whether it will prepare them for the problems and challenges that they will encounter in mathematics, science, technology, and engineering in the 21st century... (February 2011)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    Last April, at the start of my presidency, I alerted NCTM members that the Council would be concentrating on three significant ongoing issues during my term—and perhaps continuing beyond my term... (January 2011)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    Recently, I’ve received a flurry of media requests from reporters about what to tell parents whose children ask for help with their mathematics schoolwork. Family members might ask, “What do I tell my child when I don’t remember ever seeing this type of mathematics when I was a student?” (December 2010)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    In my September President’s Message, I pointed to forthcoming reports from two NCTM task forces that worked this summer on recommendations to provide assistance for states, districts, teacher leaders, and teachers who will be implementing the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The NCTM Board of Directors reviewed the task forces’ reports at its October meeting, and I want to share with you more details of their work and recommendations. (November 2010)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    As mathematics teachers, we hear “I was never any good at math” more than any other sector of our society. Rather than sympathizing with people who publicly—and proudly—make this pronouncement, it’s time for us to take them to task. The social acceptability of not being good at math has now reached epidemic proportions in our country. It has even been nationally broadcast in a recent popular film, escaping from the lips of a famous movie star. Enough, I say! (October 2010)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    I wish you all the best as we start this new school year and greet our new crop of students. As teachers, teacher educators, supervisors, publishers, parents, and administrators, let’s not forget that though we are working in challenging times, teaching mathematics to kids is still the absolute best job in the world. We are challenged, but we are also blessed. (September 2010) 

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    Recently I had the opportunity to participate in the 8th International Conference on Teaching Statistics (ICOTS). Once every four years, hundreds of teachers (elementary through tertiary levels), statisticians, and researchers gather from all over the world for a week to share the latest innovations on the teaching and learning of statistics. (August 2010)

    J. Michael Shaughnessy

    In this message I bring to your attention two new opportunities in our great mathematics education profession. The first is an example of our profession’s ability to mount cooperative efforts to improve the teaching and learning of mathematics. (June 2010)

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