YOU Have the Power to Motivate

  • YOU Have the Power to Motivate

    • Invite all students to learn math.
    • Believe in your students and foster a sense of ownership.
    • Praise students in ways that reward effort, not ability.
    • Actively listen and invite students to improve.
    • Model how you want your students to act. It’s contagious! 
    • Teach students to set goals. 
    • Encourage input and feedback often.
    • Encourage cooperation instead of competition.
    • Share a list of tips with parents and guardians. 



    Read more on how to implement these tips: 


    Invite all students to learn math. Don't beg, buy, or force. Work to invite every student to join you in learning math every day. From the moment they enter, greet them warmly, actively listen to their ideas, celebrate their unique insights and effort, and show unwavering belief in their potential. Offer varied instruction and activities to support diverse learning styles and abilities and incorporate examples or problems that connect with their individual backgrounds and experiences. Use technology to make math more interactive and fun, such as online quizzes or games. You can invite students to be the most important part of the learning process. 


    Believe in your students and foster a sense of ownership. It's crucial that you believe in your students’ potential and make sure each student knows you do. Celebrate their successes early on and emphasize that they are responsible for their own achievements. Students need to understand that failure stems from a lack of effort, not a lack of ability. To encourage perseverance in future tasks, help them develop a growth mindset by praising their effort and progress, not just their ability. 


    Praise students in ways that reward effort, not ability. By praising students for effort, they realize that their concentration and dedication are valued. They will tend to sustain the motivation and perseverance necessary in fulfilling challenging tasks. By acknowledging their hard work and persistence, you can help them develop a growth mindset and believe that they can achieve their goals. Be specific with your praise and try to focus on specific behaviors or actions that students have taken. For example, instead of saying "You're so smart," you could say "I really appreciate how you worked hard on this problem set."  


    Actively listen and invite students to improve. Help students understand that they have control over their outcomes. Instead of focusing on failure, engage in constructive conversations about how they can improve for next time. Work together to create an action plan. If they are not allowing themselves enough time, help them plan better using a planner. If they were unclear on the directions, encourage them to reach out to you before the due date to ensure they're on the right track.


    MotivateModel how you want your students to act.  It's contagious! You are actually more motivated to succeed when you see someone else succeeding. Exhibit your personal excitement about your students, your job and what we're learning. When you are challenged, value your mistakes as positive learning experiences. Model how you want your students to act by demonstrating empathy, respect, and kindness. When students see their teachers treating others with kindness and respect, they are more likely to do the same. 

     

    Teach students to set goals by providing them with opportunities to reflect on their learning and set personal targets. When students have clear goals, they are more likely to stay motivated and focused. Especially as you introduce a new project or announce an upcoming exam, work with students to set realistic and measurable goals. A goal is a contract to oneself. Direct them to break up their ultimate goal into smaller steps, including specific times to get started. Make sure that the goals are challenging, yet attainable. Check in with your students often to help them track their progress and stay motivated.


    Encourage input and feedback often. As soon students realize that you truly care about their input, they will respond by showing more concern to please you. Give them the freedom to choose the order that they complete assignments or chores, the freedom to choose an area of the classroom to work, or the freedom to select a research topic or project option. When students feel empowered to take ownership of their learning, they are more likely to stay motivated and engaged. Consider using student-centered teaching practices in your classroom, such as project-based learning or student-led discussions. These practices can help students develop a sense of agency and take ownership of their learning.


    Encourage cooperation instead of competition. As educators, our main goal should be the process of learning, and not the outcome. To create cooperative learning arrangements, be sure that your activity values effort and not only ability. Monitor the groups to ensure that each member is accountable in the creation and the final product. Encourage cooperation instead of competition by providing opportunities for students to work together on projects or tasks. When students collaborate with one another, they are more likely to develop important social skills like communication, empathy, and teamwork. Consider using cooperative learning structures in your classroom, such as jigsaw reading or group problem-solving activities. These structures can help students develop a sense of community and belonging. 


    Share a list of tips with parents and guardians. The motivation of children in school is most influenced by teachers and parents. Work together to raise motivated students! When sharing lists with parents and guardians, keep them short and easy to read. Be mindful of language barriers and varying communication skills. This ensures that all parents and guardians can effectively support their child's learning and stay engaged with their progress. Read more on how to effectively communicate with parents and guardians.